What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : Adequate Government Funding for a Broad Range of Human Needs : S Con Res 13. (Fiscal 2010 budget resolution) Sessions of Alabama amendment that would put a brake on non-defense spending for the next few years/On agreeing to the amendment
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S Con Res 13. (Fiscal 2010 budget resolution) Sessions of Alabama amendment that would put a brake on non-defense spending for the next few years/On agreeing to the amendment
senate Roll Call 120     Apr 01, 2009
Y = Conservative
N = Progressive
Winning Side:
Progressive

This vote was on an amendment by Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., that would adjust the budget resolution to allow non-defense spending to remain at 2009 levels for fiscal 2010 and 2011, then allow 1 percent increases annually from fiscal 2012 through fiscal 2014.  The amendment was offered to the budget resolution that serves as the blueprint for Congress’ budget priorities in fiscal 2010.  The budget resolution sets overall spending targets for the Appropriations committees and outlines other budget rules.

Sessions said his amendment is “reasonable and responsible” as a response to the nearly $1 trillion stimulus package recently enacted by Congress.

The stimulus, Sessions said, increase nondefense spending by an average of 30 percent over the next 3 years.  “We are not cutting our spending for discretionary accounts this year. We are seeing them surge. But in light of the stimulus package, this will be an excellent way to contain spending and save $200 billion over 5 years,” he said.
Kent Conrad, D-N.D., said now, during the midst of an economic crisis, is the wrong time to essentially freeze domestic spending.
“You would be freezing education spending, freezing health care and transportation and freezing law enforcement,” Conrad said.
By a vote of 40-58, the amendment was rejected.  All but two Republicans present voted for the amendment.  All but one Democrat present voted against the amendment.  The end result is that the measure went forward without language that would have frozen spending over the next two years and held increases the following three years to one percent annually.

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