What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : Consumer Protection : (H.R. 1586) Passage of legislation providing $53 billion for Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) operations (the FAA is the federal agency that oversees and regulates aviation activities in the U.S.), and establishing new procedures intended to improve aviation safety
 Who: All Members
[POW!]
 

To find out how your Members of Congress voted on this bill, use the form on the right.

(H.R. 1586) Passage of legislation providing $53 billion for Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) operations (the FAA is the federal agency that oversees and regulates aviation activities in the U.S.), and establishing new procedures intended to improve aviation safety
house Roll Call 190     Mar 25, 2010
Y = Conservative
N = Progressive
Winning Side:
Progressive

This was a vote on passage of legislation providing $53 billion for Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) operations. The FAA is the federal agency that oversees and regulates aviation activities in the U.S. These funds would be spent on airport planning and development, as well as aviation-related research and engineering. The bill also established new procedures intended to improve aviation safety, including a requirement that the FAA Administrator implement a runway safety plan, as well as a requirement that the FAA complete a study on combating fatigue among pilots. The bill also prohibited airline carriers from receiving immunity from anti-trust regulations. Under current law, the Transportation Department can grant such antitrust immunity to airlines seeking to form alliances.

Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-OR) argued the bill set reasonable safety standards that all members should embrace: "We will have a new, higher standard, which the good airlines are already meeting, and those who are not meeting are going to be forced to meet…This will make the American traveling public safer…this FAA bill will move us to a 21st century system for air traffic control, one that will allow the airlines much more use of our airspace, much more efficiently avoid storms, fly more fuel-efficient routes, avoid delays."

Rep. Laura Richardson (D-CA) said: "The FAA Authorization Act represents our commitment to safety in general aviation, commercial, cargo, and many other areas, especially the innovative programs to come. This is important to our economy, but also to our quality of life. I fly two times a week, 3,000 miles each way….This authorization is a step in the right direction to the total modernization that is needed and that has been long awaited."

Rep. Tom Petri (R-WI) expressed opposition to the bill "due to the inclusion of several controversial provisions…[including] a provision that would automatically sunset [eliminate] airline alliance antitrust immunity agreements 3 years after enactment. We are told this could threaten approximately 15,000 airline jobs in the United States. Considering U.S.-based airlines have already been forced to cut a staggering 41,000 jobs, nearly 10 percent of their work force in the last 2 years, further job loss resulting from this provision raises obvious concerns."

Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX) also took issue with the legislation's anti-trust provision: "By sunsetting in 3 years the antitrust immunity for airlines participating in international alliances, this bill puts at risk the global competitiveness of U.S. airlines, and reduces benefits for consumers. International alliances help better serve Americans when traveling abroad. When airlines partner together, consumers benefit from the enhanced competition."

The House passed the bill by a vote of 276-145. 242 Democrats and 34 Republicans voted "yea." 139 Republicans and 6 Democrats voted "nay." As a result, the House passed legislation providing $53 billion for FAA operations, prohibiting airline carriers from receiving immunity from anti-trust regulations, and establishing new procedures intended to improve aviation safety.

Issue Areas:

Find your Member of
Congress' votes

Select by Name