What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : Adequate Government Funding for a Broad Range of Human Needs : Reauthorization of the National Science Foundation (H.R. 1867)/Rep. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) amendment to strike the creation of a pilot program to help individuals to improve grant applications that were previously not selected for funding
 Who: All Members
[POW!]
 

To find out how your Members of Congress voted on this bill, use the form on the right.

Reauthorization of the National Science Foundation (H.R. 1867)/Rep. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) amendment to strike the creation of a pilot program to help individuals to improve grant applications that were previously not selected for funding
house Roll Call 292     May 02, 2007
Y = Conservative
N = Progressive
Winning Side:
Progressive

This vote was on an amendment to legislation reauthorizing the National Science Foundation (NSF), a large federal grant-making agency, at $21 billion through fiscal 2010. Proposed by Rep. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), the amendment would have stricken from bill the creation of a pilot program to help individuals to improve grant applications that were previously not selected for funding.

"Are there not sufficient programs within the National Science Foundation that we should be funding, that we have extra money to actually fund people who did not get the grants to help them improve their proposals that they might get a grant next year?" Flake asked.

Rep. Brian Baird (D-Wash.), who authored the legislation to which Flake was seeking to amend, said that the pilot program was designed to keep young scientists "in the pipeline."

"If you look at the data on when people are most productive, it does not correlate particularly well with when they get the most funding. There are a host of reasons for that. Part of the reason is it takes some time to learn how to do the grants," Baird said.

"Sometimes the more senior members, the people with the long established research credentials and careers are just going to have more access to research because the peer reviewers are going to say, look, it is a safe bet to bet on this guy or this woman," Baird added. "The unknown person, the new person who may hold the promise of tomorrow, has a comparative disadvantage."

Flake's amendment was rejected easily. Only seven Democrats supported it, and 71 Republicans broke ranks with their party to vote against it. Thus, on a vote of 128 to 290, the House rejected an amendment that would have stricken the creation of a pilot program within the National Science Foundation to help individuals improve grant applications that had been previously rejected, and legislation to reauthorize the agency went forward with the program in place.

Issue Areas:

Find your Member of
Congress' votes

Select by Name