What: All Issues : Government Checks on Corporate Power : Banks/Credit Card Companies : S. 1920. Bankruptcy Extension and Overhaul/Vote to Recommit to Committee Bankruptcy Reform Legislation with Instructions to Strengthen Bankruptcy Protections for Active and Former U.S. Military Personnel and Their Families.
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S. 1920. Bankruptcy Extension and Overhaul/Vote to Recommit to Committee Bankruptcy Reform Legislation with Instructions to Strengthen Bankruptcy Protections for Active and Former U.S. Military Personnel and Their Families.
house Roll Call 9     Jan 28, 2004
Y = Conservative
N = Progressive
Winning Side:
Conservative

The subject of this vote was a motion to recommit to committee a Republican-drafted bankruptcy reform bill with instructions to increase bankruptcy protections for active and former military personnel and their families. If successful, the motion to recommit would have required the legislation to be sent back to committee and amended in accordance with the aforementioned instructions. Progressives supported the motion to recommit as a way to protect military families from financial hardship caused by military service. Since the 9/11 attacks 350,000 National guard soldiers and reservists have been called to active duty, often to the detriment of family finances. Many of those ostensibly part-time soldiers, Progressives noted, were required to leave higher-paying jobs in order to serve their country. To make financial matters worse for those families, the Pentagon extended by a year or more the tours of duty for many part-time soldiers. In the view of Progressives, the underlying bankruptcy legislation should include better protections against financial hardship among current and former U.S. military personnel and their families. Conservatives voted in opposition to the motion to recommit and argued that the instructions to amend the bankruptcy legislation contained in the motion to recommit would have allowed wealthy veterans to qualify for additional bankruptcy protections which they did not need. During floor debate on the issue, Congressman Sensenbrenner (R-WI) argued that wealthy veterans such as Senator John Kerry (D-MA) should not be afforded the same bankruptcy protections as are veterans of more modest means. On a party line vote of 170-198, the motion to recommit was struck down and the underlying bankruptcy legislation was allowed to proceed to a final vote.

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