What: All Issues : Aid to Less Advantaged People, at Home & Abroad : Native Americans : H R 1409. Indians Land Exchange Act/Vote to Suspend House Rules and Adopt a Land Exchange Proposal Between the Federal Government and Cherokee Indians in North Carolina.
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H R 1409. Indians Land Exchange Act/Vote to Suspend House Rules and Adopt a Land Exchange Proposal Between the Federal Government and Cherokee Indians in North Carolina.
house Roll Call 512     Sep 23, 2003
Y = Conservative
N = Progressive
Winning Side:
Conservative

In the House, the suspensions calendar is reserved for legislation which enjoys broad, bipartisan support. By "suspending the rules"-a procedure which allows the consideration of items on the suspensions calendar, prevents amending activity on the House floor, and requires a two-thirds majority for passage-House leaders are often able to secure swift passage of widely-supported legislation. The subject of this vote was a motion to suspend the rules of the House and hold a vote on legislation which would finalize a land exchange between the federal government and the Cherokee Indian tribe in the Great Smoky Mountains of North Carolina. The purpose of the land exchange was to construct a new school for Cherokee students to replace what proponents of the measure characterized as the overcrowded, outdated, and unsafe school that Cherokee students presently attend. Progressives supported the land exchange as a way to improve the educational opportunities available to Cherokee students. Conservatives opposed the measure for two main reasons. First, the Great Smoky Mountains are one of the most visited National Parks in the United States; the land exchange, they argued, would occur in the middle of the park and would disrupt the flow of visitors to one of the nation's most pristine wildlife areas. Second, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had failed to complete an environmental impact study of the proposed land exchange. Proceeding without the EPA's recommendations, Conservatives argued, would be premature. On a vote of 288-127, the land exchange proposal attracted the necessary two-thirds majority and was adopted by the House.

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