What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : Campaign Finance Reform : HR 3991. Changes to the Tax Code/Procedural Vote to Allow Privileged Consideration of a Bill Which Would Exempt Certain Political Groups From Reporting Expenditures and Donors As Required By Current Law.
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HR 3991. Changes to the Tax Code/Procedural Vote to Allow Privileged Consideration of a Bill Which Would Exempt Certain Political Groups From Reporting Expenditures and Donors As Required By Current Law.
house Roll Call 85     Apr 10, 2002
Y = Conservative
N = Progressive
Winning Side:
Progressive

Republicans had long been opponents of the IRS, which they saw as overzealous and even illegitimate. Accordingly, they proposed a bill that would ease a wide range of mechanisms for enforcing tax collection. The bill they offered weakened or waived many first-time penalties for individual violations, extended the deadline for electronic filers to April 30, and added $3 million to the $6 million authorized for low-income taxpayer clinics. Progressives and Democrats in general did not disagree with these changes. But Republicans also added a provision that exempted certain independent political groups from reporting their expenditures and donors. Supporters of campaign finance reform-including Progressives-felt this opened a huge loophole in the campaign finance law that had been passed only the month before. To prevent campaign finance supporters from changing the tax bill to remove the disclosure exemption, the Republican leadership proposed the bill under suspension of the rules-a special status that forbids amendments but requires a two-thirds vote for passage. Their strategy was to force members to vote for a popular measure despite disagreeing with one of its provisions. Their plan was flawed, however, because support for campaign finance reform was too strong. The tax bill failed to receive a simple majority, let alone the two-thirds vote it required. It fell, 205-219.

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