What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : Curbing Presidential Power : H.R. 1559. Fiscal 2003 War Supplemental/Vote to Allow Consideration of a Bill to Fund the Initial Stages of the Iraqi War and Limit Congressional Power in Determining the Specific Uses of Those Funds.
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H.R. 1559. Fiscal 2003 War Supplemental/Vote to Allow Consideration of a Bill to Fund the Initial Stages of the Iraqi War and Limit Congressional Power in Determining the Specific Uses of Those Funds.
house Roll Call 103     Apr 03, 2003
Y = Conservative
N = Progressive
Winning Side:
Conservative

The 2004 budget resolution, a financial blueprint for future federal spending, was adopted by the House on April 1, 2003. The budget resolution, however, did not appropriate federal money to pay the costs associated with the Iraqi war effort. To budget for the costs of war and to protect the home front against terrorism, the Bush Administration crafted a $74.7 billion supplemental spending bill which was sent to Capitol Hill for debate following passage of the budget resolution. The administration's proposal included $62.6 billion for defense-related expenditures; $59.9 billion of that total, however, would be spent at the discretion of the Pentagon, not Congress. The administration's "flexibility" in war-related spending was a contentious issue between the Executive and Legislative branches of government. As the constitutional entity responsible for directing federal spending, Congress pared down the $59.9 billion requested by the executive branch for discretionary purposes; amendments to the war supplemental bill sought to further clarify how the money would be spent. This vote involved a motion to move the previous question (thus ending debate and the possibility of amendment) and adopt a rule allowing for House consideration of a $77.9 billion war supplemental spending bill. Before legislation can be considered on the House floor, a rule drafted by the House Rules Committee governing the handling of a particular bill on the floor must be adopted. Progressives opposed the motion to move the previous question on the House bill because they objected to the $25.4 billion provided in flexible spending for the president-they wanted reductions in the discretionary fund to be more in line with the $11 billion provided in the Senate's version of the bill. Democrats unanimously opposed the procedural motion but were defeated on a party-line vote of 221-200 in support of the motion.

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