What: All Issues : Human Rights & Civil Liberties : Support for Independent International Law : H.R. 418. REAL ID Act/Vote to Defeat Motion to Recommit with Instructions (Amend or Kill) Bill to Make Broad Changes to Various Aspects of U.S. Immigration and Asylum Law, Including Making It Harder for Asylum-Seekers to Prove Their Cases.
 Who: All Members
[POW!]
 

To find out how your Members of Congress voted on this bill, use the form on the right.

H.R. 418. REAL ID Act/Vote to Defeat Motion to Recommit with Instructions (Amend or Kill) Bill to Make Broad Changes to Various Aspects of U.S. Immigration and Asylum Law, Including Making It Harder for Asylum-Seekers to Prove Their Cases.
house Roll Call 30     Feb 10, 2005
Y = Conservative
N = Progressive
Winning Side:
Conservative

In this vote, the House voted not to recommit with instructions (send back to committee with instructions to take a specific action; usually a final effort by opponents of the bill to amend or kill it) H.R. 418 (The REAL ID Act), a bill to make broad changes to certain aspects of U.S. immigration and asylum laws. H.R. 418, sponsored by Sensenbrenner (R-WI), contains numerous provisions, including restricting standards for those claiming asylum, expanding the authority of immigration judges in asylum proceedings, standardizing procedures for obtaining driver's licenses amongst the states and limiting their use for federal purposes, forbidding entry into the United States of those people who have supported terrorist organizations, and removing local and state barriers to construction of a border fence at San Diego. According to Republican supporters, the bill was designed to keep terrorists out of the country. Progressives opposed the bill, stating that it would make it unjustifiably difficult for legitimate asylum-seekers to prove their cases. Republicans countered in part by comparing the asylum process to other judicial proceedings, asserting that H.R. 418 would merely grant to immigration judges the same tools that are already used by other judges, and asserting that the bill "is about protecting our borders and making our country safer." (Chabot, R-OH.) A motion to recommit with instructions is generally the final effort by opponents of a bill to amend or kill legislation in a way that favors their cause. The motion to recommit failed 195 to 229-a nearly party-line vote-with almost all Democrats voting to recommit in order to show support for the leadership position; thus, the House then proceeded to vote on final passage of the bill, which contained new restrictions on driver's licenses and would erect new barriers for whose who seek asylum in the U.S.

Issue Areas:

Find your Member of
Congress' votes

Select by Name