What: All Issues : Labor Rights : Preventing Workers' Rights From Being Eroded by International Trade Agreements : (H.R. 847, H.R. 2701, H.R. 2378) Legislation establishing a health program for 9/11 rescue workers who became ill as a result of their rescue efforts following the attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001; separate legislation authorizing annual funding for U.S. intelligence agencies; as well as a third bill that would enable the federal government to impose tariffs on countries that undervalue their currencies (such tariffs were intended to make U.S. exports more competitive) – On bringing to a final vote a resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to all three bills
 Who: All Members
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(H.R. 847, H.R. 2701, H.R. 2378) Legislation establishing a health program for 9/11 rescue workers who became ill as a result of their rescue efforts following the attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001; separate legislation authorizing annual funding for U.S. intelligence agencies; as well as a third bill that would enable the federal government to impose tariffs on countries that undervalue their currencies (such tariffs were intended to make U.S. exports more competitive) – On bringing to a final vote a resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to all three bills
house Roll Call 547     Sep 29, 2010
Y = Conservative
N = Progressive
Winning Side:
Progressive

This was a procedural vote on a resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to three separate bills. (If passed, this particular procedural motion -- known as the “previous question" -- effectively ends debate and brings the pending legislation to an immediate vote.) Those three bills included H.R. 847, which established a health program for 9/11 rescue workers who became ill as a result of their rescue efforts following the attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001; H.R. 2701, which authorized annual funding for U.S. intelligence agencies; and H.R. 2378, which enabled the federal government to impose tariffs on countries that undervalue their currencies. (Those tariffs were intended to make U.S. exports more competitive.)

Rep. Michael Arcuri (D-NY) urged support for the resolution and the underlying bills: “I strongly urge my colleagues, whether they be Democrat or Republican, liberal or conservative, northern or southern, eastern or western, to vote `yes' on the previous question and to vote `yes' on the rule [the “rule” refers to the resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments can be offered] and vote `yes' on the [9/11 workers health] bill. Those who stood up for our country in the wake of 9/11 are now counting on each of us to stand up for them. Another important measure of this rule allows for the consideration of H.R. 2378… which is necessary to level the international playing field so that United States manufacturers can fairly compete with our trading partners. China is, without a doubt, undercutting our nation's industrial base by devaluing its currency and dumping products into our markets, and we must do something about it.”

Rep. Lincoln Diaz-Balart (R-FL) urged opposition the resolution, arguing the intelligence bill omitted Republican-backed policies: “The legislation…removes the prohibition on using intelligence funding to bring prisoners from Guantanamo [the detention facility where the U.S. government had held suspected terrorists] to the United States, and it excludes…[a provision] that would prohibit the granting of Miranda rights [the rights that police officers must explain to criminal suspects in the United States, such as the “right to remain silent”] to foreign terrorists captured overseas.”

The House agreed to the previous question motion by a vote of 235-183. 235 Democrats voted “yea.” 171 Republicans and 12 Democrats voted “nay.” As a result, the House proceeded to a final vote on a resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to legislation establishing a health program for 9/11 rescue workers who became ill as a result of their rescue efforts following the attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001; separate legislation authorizing annual funding for U.S. intelligence agencies; as well as a third bill that would enable the federal government to impose tariffs on countries that undervalue their currencies.

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