What: All Issues : Health Care : Medical Research Funding : On passage of a Democratic amendment to the fiscal year 2005 budget resolution (S.Con.Res 95) creating a reserve fund that would allow up to $30.5 billon in additional spending in fiscal year 2005 through fiscal year 2009 for medical research and for health services, such as tobacco cessation programs, paid for by increasing the cigarette tax to $1 per pack.
 Who: All Members
[POW!]
 

To find out how your Members of Congress voted on this bill, use the form on the right.

On passage of a Democratic amendment to the fiscal year 2005 budget resolution (S.Con.Res 95) creating a reserve fund that would allow up to $30.5 billon in additional spending in fiscal year 2005 through fiscal year 2009 for medical research and for health services, such as tobacco cessation programs, paid for by increasing the cigarette tax to $1 per pack.
senate Roll Call 46     Mar 11, 2004
Y = Conservative
N = Progressive
Winning Side:
Conservative

Progressives lost by a large margin when Sen. Tom Harkin's (D-Iowa) amendment taking on both tax cuts and the powerful tobacco lobby was brought up for debate during the Senate's consideration of the fiscal year 2005 budget resolution (S.Con.Res 95). Harkin's amendment, which would have created a reserve fund that would allow up to $30.5 billon in additional spending in fiscal year 2005 through fiscal year 2009 for medical research and for health services, such as tobacco cessation programs, was soundly defeated with 29 Democrats joining all but two Republicans in defeating the measure. The reason being that Harkin's amendment would increase the amount dedicated for deficit reduction by $2 billion, and the spending would be offset by increasing the cigarette tax to $1 per pack - something conservatives ardently opposed on the grounds it constitutes a tax increase. Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.), a heart and lung surgeon, led the opposition to the Harkin amendment, saying that while he shared the "overall goal" of reducing tobacco use, "I'm against raising taxes. And that is exactly what this amendment is--a tax increase and a large one. Moreover, it is very regressive. It raises taxes on many people who can't afford it." The Harkin amendment was defeated 32-64, thus Harkin's proposal that tobacco users shoulder a tax to help reduce the deficit and further medical research was rejected.

Issue Areas:

Find your Member of
Congress' votes

Select by Name